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Old 10-02-2018, 02:32 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by XoXSciFiGuy View Post
Oil spindle position, correct, at TDC: Notice if you looking down at the engine from the drivers' side, spindle is at the 11:25 clock position. Not 1130, not 1120, which will be OFF by a bunch of degrees. 11:25 o clock. Notice the end of the spindle is slightly toward the FRONT of the engine.
My guess is that's why so many people do this simple Timing Chain job on their own and screw everything up: Because it needs to be at 11:25, exactly.

For someone who's never done that before (like me), I'm guessing they would have a really hard time knowing the difference.
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Old 10-02-2018, 02:54 PM   #32
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My guess is that's why so many people do this simple Timing Chain job on their own and screw everything up: Because it needs to be at 11:25, exactly.

For someone who's never done that before (like me), I'm guessing they would have a really hard time knowing the difference.
The difference between one tooth and the next is significant. Heís overstating the precision of this operation. The spindle has probably 24 +/- teeth on it. Thatís about 15 degrees of separation per tooth. I usually say it needs to be at about 11:45. The reason people get it installed incorrectly is because they didnít make an effort to get it right. They just installed the stuff and kept going.
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Old 10-02-2018, 06:11 PM   #33
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found this video helpful. Ill give it a go this weekend


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2dBx_OAuZE
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Old 10-02-2018, 06:43 PM   #34
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Yep, that’s Foul_Mouth’s YouTube channel. Good content there
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:12 AM   #35
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It's not really that hard to tell if you get it wrong on the spindle. One way that helps is to bring the engine up to absolute TDC using the feel-the-piston-in-the-spark-plug-hole method using a long screwdriver. When you get it to TDC, just pull your distributor and make a matchmark on the distributor mounting plate that matches where your spindle is pointing. Top part of the notch on the spindle, or bottom (drivers side) doesn't matter. I usually use something to make a scratch mark on the plate where the distributor bolts up and that works.

Then when you shove that oil pump up the engine's wazoo, you can look to see if the spindle points to your matchmark.

Like Alabama said, a lot of people go off by a tooth and then just leave it that way. When the engine starts popping or running like shit...they just turn the distributor way off to compensate. This is NOT a good idea. Engine will never run quite right doing that.

Alabama says in part: "I usually say it needs to be at about 11:45."

Robert replies: This is the incorrect setting, but it can happen if you don't bring that number one piston right up to absolute TDC. Then maybe 11:45 works. This is why I use the screwdriver method. You see...when you can actually FEEL the piston go up and down when you are turning the crank bolt, it's easy to set it at the absolute top. You know...you get to the top...and then you turn the crank bolt a teeny bit more...piston starts to go back down...you turn the crank bolt back the other way a bit. But feeling it like that with the screwdriver in the spark plug hole, you can make tiny adjustments until you KNOW you are at the absolute top of the stroke. Then the factory pictures really work, and make a solid guide for you to follow.

After you get your pump and distributor back on, then it's just a matter of setting the timing to specs. You're there. I'm not best mechanic on Earth, but I've done at least twenty of these chain/oil pump/front cover jobs. Maybe more. Some (barf) Toyotas too.

On a side note, if you've thought about pulling your oil pan and scraping the gunk out of it, this is a good time to do it. Maybe even go all the way with a new chain, tensioner, and oil pan gasket. In a really weird deal, a friend of mine and I (just to see if it worked on an engine sitting on the ground) used shoebox cardboard and a ball peen hammer to tap out a bunch of gaskets for the engine. You lay the cardboard on the appropriate part of the engine and GENTLY tap out around it to cut the cardboard, and then use a razor knife to clear for the bolt holes. None of them leaked LOL. He told me that's what people sometimes did in the 'old days'. We didn't do this with the intake, exhaust, or head of course.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:39 AM   #36
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The first time I did one of these sucked...I think it took me 20 tries or so to get it. When you are putting the shaft back in you have to remember that it will rotate slightly as it catches the gear on the crank snout, so it helps to start 10 to 15 degrees away from where you actually want to be. And for the sake of preserving your sanity...once you get it right take a paint pen and make marks on the rotor and the distributor case. Then there's no guessing involved next time around.
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Old 10-04-2018, 05:43 AM   #37
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What SBJ said...

I want to give my standard advice to anyone who pulls a front cover from a Nissan four banger: Put a blanket or a towel below it on the ground. Or be VERY careful not to drop it. Those aluminum covers, after being subjected to twenty-plus years of being heated and then cooled during normal use? They will frickin' SHATTER like a cocktail glass if you drop them. Or at least put a crack near one of your bolt holes. And then you are seriously screwed.
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Old 10-05-2018, 06:38 PM   #38
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hopefully wont have to take off the front cover


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Originally Posted by XoXSciFiGuy View Post
What SBJ said...

I want to give my standard advice to anyone who pulls a front cover from a Nissan four banger: Put a blanket or a towel below it on the ground. Or be VERY careful not to drop it. Those aluminum covers, after being subjected to twenty-plus years of being heated and then cooled during normal use? They will frickin' SHATTER like a cocktail glass if you drop them. Or at least put a crack near one of your bolt holes. And then you are seriously screwed.
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Old 10-05-2018, 06:47 PM   #39
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If you are just a tooth off on the distributor shaft there's no need to remove the timing cover. Once you take the distributor and oil pump out the shaft will pretty much fall out. As stated earlier, make absolutely sure the engine is at TDC before you tear into it. Also, you'll probably want to pick up another oil pump gasket and maybe a distributor o-ring before you start.
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Old 10-05-2018, 07:35 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SBJ View Post
If you are just a tooth off on the distributor shaft there's no need to remove the timing cover. Once you take the distributor and oil pump out the shaft will pretty much fall out. As stated earlier, make absolutely sure the engine is at TDC before you tear into it. Also, you'll probably want to pick up another oil pump gasket and maybe a distributor o-ring before you start.
is it possible for the chain to be off a tooth?
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