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Old 11-13-2018, 06:22 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by caseyfk View Post
My truck overheated. I added water to the coolant, let it cool, and drove home. The next day I checked the oil and it was mixed with water. I immediately assumed I needed a head gasket. I put in Blue Devil head gasket sealer and drove it for 1,000 miles (without water in the oil after an oil change and the sealer). Then, I got to pull apart the engine in high school auto shop and it turns out that the timing chain wore through the timing cover. My head gasket was in great shape.
That's very interesting... did the head gasket sealer make a mess of your cooling system? My timing chain could have worn through the timing cover as well, but XoXSciFiGuy said my head gasket is blown for sure.


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Originally Posted by jp2code View Post
This first part in Post 1:

> My power steering belt broke while driving, and I drove it
> like this for a little while, although I don't think it was related
> to the overheating.

Makes me think it's time to change out the belts while you've got it all apart.



I'm not sure about what side to point up. If you were filling the transmission, you'd want the passenger's side higher. I don't know if other jobs benefit from one side being higher than the other, though.
I see what you were saying about the belts. I replaced the power steering belt but yes, new belts would be a good idea. I have been chasing a belt squeak for some time now.


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Originally Posted by cadillacdude1975 View Post
Pinstripe it is a crap shoot either way with repairing your current engine issue versus getting a used engine unless you know it to be a good donor. finding an engine should not be too hard. its just a pain in the ass to deal with the headache, but worth it in the long run. if you plan to keep the truck a really long time, then just take your time and do it correctly.
I get what you are saying. I think I am going to try and fix the engine.

It's starting to get pretty cold at night now, it was about 3 degrees Celsius (around 37 Fahrenheit) and I basically have only water in the cooling system. Should I pour some coolant in there and start the engine to circulate it so the water doesn't freeze and crack the block? Is there anything else I should do before I take things apart and the engine isn't able to start?

I'm probably going to work on this over several days or weeks... with the engine taken apart, should I just close the hood each day and it'll be good, even in cold temperatures? Should I cover the valve cover area with a cloth?

I've been watching YouTube videos and searching on here... if anybody knows of any good head gasket and timing chain tutorials, please let me know!

Thanks for all the help.
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Old 11-13-2018, 10:39 AM   #12
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I'd put a rag or something over the exposed valves and rocker arms when you are not working on it.

Dust could get in there, and it will stick to all the oily parts. Around here, bugs would get in and start living inside (especially dirt daubers). At 37F, you should not have that problem, but there could be other things to worry about.

Better yet, just set the valve cover back on top, and thread in a couple of the screws. That way, if a critter gets crawling around under the hood, it can't knock the valve cover off.
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:41 AM   #13
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This is chintzy, old school advice: If the truck still runs, you could detail it inside and out, and I mean DETAIL, even the engine. Wash the seats and interior, wash and wax the body. Clean off the cap, change the oil and DON'T start it afterward, install some antifreeze, and SELL IT.

I don't usually give this kind of advice, but on the other hand it's caveat emptor ('Let the buyer beware') when it comes to selling cars. It is the responsibility of the buyer to check things before he plunks down his money. It is NOT your responsibility to point out every defect on the rig.

Just don't try to sell it to any of us. (That's a joke) Can you tell I used to be a used car salesman? I don't endorse these actions officially, but sometimes you just have to take things into your own hands...and like Kurt Russell said in the movie Used Cars...

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"Get their confidence...get their trust...and then get their money..."
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Last edited by XoXSciFiGuy; 11-14-2018 at 08:47 AM.
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Old 11-14-2018, 04:17 PM   #14
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The head gasket on these really isn't that bad of a job. It's time consuming for sure but it's pretty straightforward. If you decide to go that route it's a good idea to take the head into a machine shop and have them clean/resurface it as well as replace the valve stem seals (they're not related to the problem but it would suck to have it start blowing smoke on startup a couple years later). Probably the hardest thing is unhooking the EGR pipe. You'll want to soak it and the exhaust with PB blaster for a while before you start working on it. It's also a great time to replace things like the timing chain and water pump. Oh, and new head bolts.

Also...definitely put some coolant in the block and make sure the radiator is empty. Better yet take it out for more working room. In theory the block's freeze plugs should do their job but replacing those can be a separate headache in and of itself.

I would offer to help if I lived closer...I used to live in Whatcom County WA and hold a valid passport.

Last edited by SBJ; 11-15-2018 at 02:42 AM.
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Old 11-15-2018, 02:00 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XoXSciFiGuy View Post
This is chintzy, old school advice: If the truck still runs, you could detail it inside and out, and I mean DETAIL, even the engine. Wash the seats and interior, wash and wax the body. Clean off the cap, change the oil and DON'T start it afterward, install some antifreeze, and SELL IT.

I don't usually give this kind of advice, but on the other hand it's caveat emptor ('Let the buyer beware') when it comes to selling cars. It is the responsibility of the buyer to check things before he plunks down his money. It is NOT your responsibility to point out every defect on the rig.

Just don't try to sell it to any of us. (That's a joke) Can you tell I used to be a used car salesman? I don't endorse these actions officially, but sometimes you just have to take things into your own hands...and like Kurt Russell said in the movie Used Cars...
You often give this sort of advice. It's not particularly helpful.
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Old 11-18-2018, 10:03 AM   #16
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Sometimes you just have to know when the time is right to move a vehicle OUT...and ON to the next. This last summer I ditched the wife's 91 Civic that had synchros gone, body damage driver front, a crappy interior, and bad brakes...but a HOT engine...for $1,400.

Then I picked her up a 98 Pathy for $1,300 that runs solid with reasonable miles. Everything works. The only fault was they painted it primer black. Nice job, though. Ask her which one she would rather drive right now. I took her rig to Mount Rainier a couple of weeks ago. Cruised there and back without missing a beat. The Honda leaked water into the trunk in wintertime.

There's nothing wrong with wheeling and dealing in vehicles. Never drive a rig until it drops and is good for nothing better than the wrecking yard. If you can't fix it yourself or can't afford to do it, send it away. I learned this a long time ago.

https://youtu.be/zqHZWdFVyyQ
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Last edited by XoXSciFiGuy; 11-18-2018 at 10:11 AM.
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Old 11-24-2018, 12:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jp2code View Post
I'd put a rag or something over the exposed valves and rocker arms when you are not working on it.

Dust could get in there, and it will stick to all the oily parts. Around here, bugs would get in and start living inside (especially dirt daubers). At 37F, you should not have that problem, but there could be other things to worry about.

Better yet, just set the valve cover back on top, and thread in a couple of the screws. That way, if a critter gets crawling around under the hood, it can't knock the valve cover off.
That's a good idea, I didn't even think to put the valve cover back on top.


Quote:
Originally Posted by XoXSciFiGuy View Post
This is chintzy, old school advice: If the truck still runs, you could detail it inside and out, and I mean DETAIL, even the engine. Wash the seats and interior, wash and wax the body. Clean off the cap, change the oil and DON'T start it afterward, install some antifreeze, and SELL IT.

I don't usually give this kind of advice, but on the other hand it's caveat emptor ('Let the buyer beware') when it comes to selling cars. It is the responsibility of the buyer to check things before he plunks down his money. It is NOT your responsibility to point out every defect on the rig.

Just don't try to sell it to any of us. (That's a joke) Can you tell I used to be a used car salesman? I don't endorse these actions officially, but sometimes you just have to take things into your own hands...and like Kurt Russell said in the movie Used Cars...
Haha... even with fresh coolant and oil, the rusty wheel wells would give away the fact that this truck needs some work!


Quote:
Originally Posted by SBJ View Post
The head gasket on these really isn't that bad of a job. It's time consuming for sure but it's pretty straightforward. If you decide to go that route it's a good idea to take the head into a machine shop and have them clean/resurface it as well as replace the valve stem seals (they're not related to the problem but it would suck to have it start blowing smoke on startup a couple years later). Probably the hardest thing is unhooking the EGR pipe. You'll want to soak it and the exhaust with PB blaster for a while before you start working on it. It's also a great time to replace things like the timing chain and water pump. Oh, and new head bolts.

Also...definitely put some coolant in the block and make sure the radiator is empty. Better yet take it out for more working room. In theory the block's freeze plugs should do their job but replacing those can be a separate headache in and of itself.

I would offer to help if I lived closer...I used to live in Whatcom County WA and hold a valid passport.
Thanks for the ideas and the offer. I may end up taking the head into a machine shop as it's most likely warped. I don't know if I will do the valve stem seals though.


Quote:
Originally Posted by XoXSciFiGuy View Post
Sometimes you just have to know when the time is right to move a vehicle OUT...and ON to the next. This last summer I ditched the wife's 91 Civic that had synchros gone, body damage driver front, a crappy interior, and bad brakes...but a HOT engine...for $1,400.

Then I picked her up a 98 Pathy for $1,300 that runs solid with reasonable miles. Everything works. The only fault was they painted it primer black. Nice job, though. Ask her which one she would rather drive right now. I took her rig to Mount Rainier a couple of weeks ago. Cruised there and back without missing a beat. The Honda leaked water into the trunk in wintertime.

There's nothing wrong with wheeling and dealing in vehicles. Never drive a rig until it drops and is good for nothing better than the wrecking yard. If you can't fix it yourself or can't afford to do it, send it away. I learned this a long time ago.

https://youtu.be/zqHZWdFVyyQ
You're right, and I do have a limit as for how much time and money I will put into this truck. I haven't hit it yet, and I still want to get it going! Right now I think it's good for nothing better than the wrecking yard though, unfortunately.
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Old 11-24-2018, 01:02 PM   #18
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I have some more questions about the head gasket replacement. Is it possible to replace it without taking off the timing cover? I know you can set the engine to top dead center, and then mark the timing chain and the pulley... but is it possible to remove the head while ensuring the timing chain doesn't slip off of the crankshaft pulley (the smaller pulley at the bottom of the engine)?

If I understand it correctly, I can take the valve cover off and turn the engine with a breaker bar until the marks on the crankshaft pulley line up at 0 degrees. The camshaft keyway should be at 12 o'clock, and the #1 cylinder should be at the top, on the compression stroke. Also, the rotor should be pointing to the #1 spark plug wire. After the repair, with everything back together, I can set the timing to 10 degrees before top dead center using a timing light, by loosening the oil pump bolts and slightly adjusting it. Does this sound right?

If I have the head resurfaced, the camshaft components might shift and not remain at top dead center, so should I just take a picture and make sure everything is back in the same position when I reinstall the head?

Once I have the valve cover off, I should be able to look down and see if the timing chain has worn a hole through the cover, is this correct?

Can I do this repair without removing the rotor and oil pump?

Is it okay to crank the engine by hand with a breaker bar, without damaging any of the camshaft components?

Here are a few more pictures of the milkshake my truck made. Thank you to everybody for all the replies.





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Old 11-25-2018, 09:33 AM   #19
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In order to replace the head gasket, you MUST pull the front cover. This is because the upper front cover bolts attach to the head, and the head must be at least partially removed to replace the gasket. You should also remove your front oil pan bolts, and loosen others enough around the pan to drop the pan just a bit.

YES. The oil pump and distributor must be removed. You can't remove the front cover otherwise. Switch out your chain and tensioner as well, if you are going to do all that. If you want to go the Full Monty, pull the crossmember and not only LOOSEN the oil pan, but drop it completely and change the gasket. It, and the crossmember, as well as all new oil, go back on LAST.

The radiator will have to be removed, and coolant drained first. Don't let it spill on the ground, or if it does, wash it down good with fresh water. Otherwise you will kill any neighborhood cat or dog (especially cats, who are attracted to the taste of anti-freeze) by giving them kidney failure. It poisons them, and quickly. A few licks off the ground of the green stuff and they are history.
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Last edited by XoXSciFiGuy; 11-25-2018 at 09:39 AM.
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Old 11-25-2018, 12:46 PM   #20
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Yes, it’s possible to replace the head gasket without removing the timing chain. Many guys build a timing chain wedge to keep it in position while the head is off. Just google ka24e timing chain wedge and you’ll find directions for that. Frankly, if you don’t know the history of the timing chain you should take this as a perfect opportunity to replace it.

When you mention adjusting the timing you asked if this was done by loosening the oil pump. This is not correct. You adjust the timing by loosening the distributor bolts and rotating the distributor until you get 10 degrees btdc. This is done with the engine at operating temperature with the TPS disconnected.

To make sure the head is in proper timing when you reinstall it, just make sure all the valves on the #1 cylinder are closed when you install the head. This is the compression stroke. When you remove the timing chain sprocket from the end of the cam shaft you will zip tie the chain to the sprocket so it can’t move while the head is off. This will also assure that everything is aligned when you reinstall it. This is assuming you opt to not replace the timing chain, which is a method I don’t recommend.

You should be able to see the location where the timing chain typically cuts the timing cover with the valve cover removed. If not, you most certainly can with the head removed.

You can replace the head gasket without removing the oil pump but, again, this is not something I’d recommend. I think you should go ahead and replace the chain, guides, and tensioner. It’s a ka24e, this isn’t a matter of IF the timing chain is gonna need replacement, but WHEN. Now is the time to do it.

When you rotate the engine manually, always do so from the crankshaft pulley and not the camshaft sprocket. Rotate it clockwise.
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